An entire year trapped in the Arctic ice

MOSAiC - Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate

It could be the largest-scale Arctic research expedition of all time: In September 2019, the German research icebreaker Polarstern departed from Tromsø (Norway) and, once it had reached its destination, will spend the next year drifting through the Arctic Ocean, trapped in the ice. A total of 600 people, who will be supplied by other icebreakers and aircraft, will participate in the expedition – and several times that number of researchers will subsequently use the data gathered to take climate and ecosystem research to the next level. More than 70 research institutions from 20 countries are involved in the expedition. The mission is spearheaded by the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI).

Read more about the expedition on the MOSAiC website. 

News

Falling Walls Science Summit 2021

Falling Walls Science Summit 2021

At this international and interdisciplinary forum for the scientific dialogue between researchers and society, sea ice physicist Stefanie Arndt and MOSAiC project leader Markus Rex from the Alfred Wegener Institute will speak on November 9 from 12:25 p.m. under the title "Breaking The Wall To Measuring Climate Change". The event will be streamed live from the Radialsystem in Berlin.

Livestream and further information

The AWI at the COP26 summit

The AWI at the COP26 summit

At the 26th UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow (COP26), the Alfred Wegener Institute is represented on site with various contributions: On November 3rd from 14:00-15:00 (CET) the panel discussion of the EU Polar Cluster will be moderated by AWI expert Nicole Biebow and Marcel Nicolaus, AWI expert on sea ice will give the keynote speech on the MOSAiC expedition on the same day at 18:30 (CET).

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Virtual research lab for MOSAiC data

Project M-VRE

Virtual research lab for MOSAiC data

Researchers around the globe should have access to the valuable data from the MOSAiC expedition. In order to rapidly make user-friendly access to this information possible, the Alfred Wegener Institute, together with the DKRZ Hamburg and the DLR Jena, will develop a series of analytical tools that will allow initially researchers, and subsequently the general public, to access and work with the Arctic data online. The project has received ca. 2 million euros of funding from Germany’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research.