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Photos of ARK-XXVII - the 27th Arctic Expedition of RV Polarstern

Images illustrating the findings of RV Polarstern ARK-XXVII/3 Shipboard Science Party during the 2012 sea ice minimum in the Arctic. The reaction of the deep sea ecosystem to changes in sea ice cover and ocean productivity has now been published in the scientific journal Science Express by a multidisciplinary team of researchers around Prof. Dr. Antje Boetius from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research.

The following pictures can be used to illustrate editorial content in relation to our press release of 14 February 2013. Please state the name of the photographer as well as the Alfred Wegener Institute as source. Please read our Terms and Conditions of Use.

 

Scientists investigate physics an biology of, in and under the sea ice on an expedition with RV Polarstern in the high Arctic during the sea ice minimum in summer 2012. Photo: Stefan Hendricks, Alfred Wegener Institute

RV Polarstern anchored at an ice flow during its 27th Arctic expedition. Photo: Sea Ice Group, Alfred Wegener Institute

Preparing sensors for measurements on sea ice. Photo: Karl Attard, NIOZ / Alfred Wegener Institute

Controlling the ROV from the tent on ice station. Photo: Stefan Hendricks, Alfred-Wegener-Institut

ROV pilot tent on sea ice. Photo: Marcel Nicolaus, Alfred Wegener Institute

Martin Schiller preparing the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) for a dive under sea ice. Photo: Marcel Nicolaus, Alfred Wegener Institute

Helicopter tows EM-Bird - an electromagnetic device to measure sea ice thickness. Photo: Stefan Hendricks, Alfred Wegener Institute

Melosira arctica grows on the bottom side of ice floes. Photo: Mar Fernandez-Mendez, Alfred Wegener Institute

Melosira arctica grows on the bottom side of ice floes. Photo: Mar Fernandez-Mendez, Alfred Wegener Institute

Deep Sea bottom with patches of algae, which sank down from the surface to more than 4,000 metres. Photo: Antje Boetius, Alfred Wegener Institute

Sea cucumber feeding on algae. Photo: Antje Boetius, Alfred Wegener Institute

A sea cucumber approaches a large algae spot on the sea floor in more than 4,000 metres depth. Photo: Antje Boetius, Alfred Wegener Institute

Cucumber of the genuis Kolga feeding on ice algae. Photo: Antje Boetius, Alfred Wegener Institute

One to two individual sea cucumbers per square metre are a high density for deep sea researchers. The animals feed from material which algae form on the water's surface and which then sinks down several thousands of metres. Photo: OFOS, Alfred Wegener Institute

Sea anemones are animals which feed in the deep sea from material which algae form on the water's surface and which then sinks down several thousands of metres. Photo: OFOS, Alfred Wegener Institute

Expedition participants on an ice flow, on which they investigated life on and under the ice during the Arctic sea ice minimum in summer 2012. Photo: Alfred Wegener Institute

Several groups take possession of the sea ice habitat of every ice station: water samples from the melting pools, the ice itself and the water beneath – everything is investigated for plants, animals and microorganisms. Photo: Mar Fernandez, Alfred Wegener Institute

Researchers discovered a surprising amount of algae in the pools on the sea ice. Photo: Christiane Uhlig, Alfred Wegener Institut

Polarstern travelled around 12,000 kilometres during the expedition from Tromsø through the Arctic and back to Bremerhaven. The chart shows the extension of the sea ice (in white and grey) in September 2012: only 3.41 million square kilometres were still covered in ice – the smallest value since the start of satellite records in 1973. The smallest sea ice cover of 2007 is shown in yellow. In 2012 the ice cover of the Arctic was less than 18%. Graphic: Marcel Nicolaus, Alfred Wegener Institute

Polarstern in the Central Arctic (position approx. 83° N, 130° O): the AWI researchers have measured that one-year thin sea ice predominated in the Arctic in the summer of 2012. The ice cover is permeated by open water areas; many melting pools are to be found on the sea ice. Photo: Stefan Hendricks, Alfred Wegener Institute

A little craftsmanship is also called for to track down the microalgae: biologists saw an ice core in which they later find the algae. Photo: Marcel Nicolaus, Alfred Wegener Institute

Below-ice view of greatly deformed sea ice. A guidance mark has also been attached. The marker (black and white, in the centre of the picture) is 1 m long. Photo: ROV Ronia, Sea Ice Physics Section, Alfred Wegener Institute

During a dive the under-ice robot going by the name of Ronia took this image of algae. Diatoms can form metre-long chains beneath the ice – in the summer of 2012 the researchers were able to demonstrate this for the first time also in one-year ice. Photo: ROV Ronia, Sea Ice Physics Section, Alfred Wegener Institute

This special net called SUIT (Surface Under Ice Trawl) fishes directly below the sea ice. Photo: Benjamin Rabe, Alfred Wegener Institute

Polar cod were to be found in almost every catch using the under-ice net SUIT. They depend on the sea ice as habitat. Photo: Hauke Flores, Alfred Wegener Institute

Starfish, sponges and crabs: life several thousands of metres below the ice of the Arctic is very varied. Photo: OFOS, Alfred Wegener Institute

The preparation of the samples is a little reminiscent of sand pits. Deep sea researchers find starfish, sea cucumbers, crabs and many other animals in the mud from a depth of several thousand metres. Photo: Antje Boetius, Alfred Wegener Institute

A so-called “lander“ is heaved back on board. The device comes from the bottom of the deep sea where it has been measuring the oxygen consumption in the mud amongst other things using fine sensors. Photo: Alfred Wegener Institute

Prof. Antje Boetius, chief scientist on the 27th Arctic expedition of RV Polarstern. Photo: Albert Gerdes, Marum


 

Images Polarstern Expedition ARK-XXVI

The following pictures may be used for publications about the 26th Arctic expedition of the German RV Polarstern. Please quote the photographer as indicated in the copyright remarks of the IPTC-metadata of the images.

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Hallmark of the sea ice group of the AWI, a heated tent in which shelters the electronics for an underwater vehicle (ROV) named "Alfred" is is. Used "Alfred" in order to measure the light conditions under the ice. Photo: Mario Hoppmann, Alfred Wegener Institute

The research Vessel Polarstern in the central Arctic. In the foreground an ROV team works. On display are also biologists, geochemists and a fog bow in the background. Photo: Mario Hoppmann, Alfred-Wegener-Institute

This aerial photograph shows the research icebreaker Polarstern at the North Pole. Photo: Mario Hoppmann, Alfred Wegener Institute

Fahrtroute der Polarstern auf der Expedition ARK XXVI/1 mit Meereisbedeckung vom 29.06.2011
Route of the Polarstern expedition to the ARK XXVI/1 with sea ice from 06/29/2011

Route of the Polarstern expedition to the ARK XXVI/2 with sea ice from 07/23/2011, Map: Thomas Krumpen; Wolfgang Cohrs und Gert König-Langlo, Alfred Wegener Institute

Route of the Polarstern expedition to the ARK-XXVI/3 with sea ice from 09/06/2011, Map: Thomas Krumpen; Wolfgang Cohrs und Gert König-Langlo, Alfred Wegener Institute

Scientists Marcel Nicolaus and Priska Hunkeler put the ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) "Alfred" into the water through a hole in the ice. In the background one can see the tent where the pilots of the ROV are going to work and a reference sensor. Photo: Stefan Hendricks, Alfred-Wegener-Institute

Two ROV-pilots during a mission. Scientist Christian Katlein (front) is steering the ROV, while scientist Priska Hunkeler (back) is checking the measurements and writing the missions journal. Photo: Marcel Nicolaus, Alfred Wegener Institute

ROV station on the arctic sea ice. The Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV), called "Alfred", was led into the water through a meltpond and is now measuring the light radiation underneath the ice. Two scientists are holding its cable, while the two pilots of the ROV are working in the orange tent. Photo: Marcel Nicolaus, Alfred Wegener Institute

The Rov (Remotely Operated Vehicle) Alfred right befort its light measurment mission. It is equippes with two radiation sensors, typ Rames and connected to a cable which is 300 meters long. In the background one can see scientist Stefan Hendricks with a rifle. He is looking for polar bears. The photo was taken in the 14 August 2011, Photo: Marcel Nicolaus, Alfred Wegener Institute

A ROV (Remotely operated vehicle) is coming back from its mission underneath the arctic sea ice, while a scientist is pulling its tether. The sea ise around is mostly one year old and strongly covered with meltponds. Photo: Marcel Nicolaus, Alfred Wegener Institute

Sea Ice thickness measured by ice drills. Photo: Stefan Hendricks, Alfred-Wegener-Institute

The electromagnetic sensor EM-Bird is drawen for the ice thickness measurements in a canoe on the sea ice. Photo: Stefan Hendricks, Alfred-Wegener-Institute

Scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute are installing a ice buoy, which atuomatically measures salinity and temperature underneath its ice float. Photo: oto: Oliver Zenk, Alfred Wegener Institute

Scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute are installing a ice buoy, which atuomatically measures salinity and temperature underneath its ice float. Photo: Ian Waddington

Scientisis and technicians pull a mooring on board. The moored device is a "Moored profiler" that measures currents velocity, temperature, conductivity and depth, Photo: Mario Hoppmann, Alfred Wegener Institute

Mooring material prepared for deployment in Fram Strait, Photo: Agnieszka Beszczyknska-Möller, Alfred Wegener Institute

Recovery of mooring in Fram Strait, Photo: Agnieszka Beszczyknska-Möller, Alfred Wegener Institute

Preparation of mooring material used. Photo: Agnieszka Beszczyknska-Möller, Alfred Wegener Institute

Illustration of the mooring in the Fram Strait. Graphic: German marine Research Consortium (KDM)

Computer-generated view of the payload of the AUV as it is used during ARK XXVI/2. On display are: the various sensors, CO2, O2, turbidity, fluorescence, PAR. (Not to view: CTD); the payload control computer (control of the payload and storing the measured data); Water sampler (removal of max. 22 á 220 ml water samples to determine, for example, content of dissolved carbon or the content of nutrient salt). Graphic: Thorben Wulff, Alfred Wegener Institute

The AUV in Polarstern in the Geo-wet-lab while preparing for a dive. All sections of the vehicle are open. Photo: Martin Sperling, Alfred Wegener Institute

The AUV will be recovered after a successful mission, under the Arctic ice (26/07/11). Photo: Nicole Hildebrand, Alfred Wegener Institute

load capacity (here: water sample memory) of the AUV for ARK XXVI/2. Photo: Thorben Wulff, Alfred Wegener Institute

On the research vessel Polarstern mooring is discarded. Photo: Eberhard Fahrbach, Alfred Wegener Institute

Graphical representation of the AUV of the AWI deep-sea biologists, graphic: Thorben Wulff, Alfred Wegener Institute

Graphical representation of the AUV of the AWI deep-sea biologists, graphic: Thorben Wulff, Alfred Wegener Institute

CTD Rosette for water sampling, Photo: Peter Lemke, Alfred Wegener Institute

For the sampling of virtually undisturbed deep-sea sediments we usually use a multiple corer (MUC). This device, lowered to the seafloor by the ships wire, is able to sample up to twelve sediment cores of approximately 30 cm in length. At great water depths (> 4,000 m), a single MUC deployment may take several hours. Even if the sampling sites are located in close vicinity, sampling with a conventional MUC thus generally needs a considerable amount of time. Photo. Alfred Wegener Institut

Scientists are evakuating samples from a multicorer. Photo: Gauthier Chapelle, Alfred Wegener Institute

Deployment of the multicorer, Photo: M. Schueller, Alfred Wegener Institute

Recovery of a fish trap Landers, Photo: Sascha Lehmenhecker, Alfred Wegener Institute

Spreading from one corer aboard the Polarstern. Photo: Ingo Schewe, Alfred Wegener Institute

A sediment traps is lowered into the water, Photo: Ingo Schewe, Alfred Wegener Institute


 
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