Polarstern Expedition

ROV in Antarctic waters

Scientists eplore hot vents and cold seeps in the Southern Ocean
[11. April 2019] 

Where the Earth’s plates meet, there is evidence of their motion. An expedition of the Research Vessel Polarstern will explore this activity in the Southern Ocean in detail. The major focus of the expedition led by scientists from MARUM is to examine hot vents and cold seeps. This will be the first deployment of the remotely operated vehicle MARUM-QUEST in the Antarctic region. The start of the expedition is scheduled for 13 April 2019.

For chief scientist Gerhard Bohrmann and his team it is not the first expedition to the Southern Ocean. The researchers have been studying questions relating to the circulation of fluids and gases at hot vents and cold seeps along the Sandwich Plate since 2012. With an east-west width of 350 kilometers and a north-south length of around 550 kilometers, the Sandwich Plate is a relatively small plate, but it represents the most active crustal area between the large South American and Antarctic Plates. The Sandwich Plate is formed by spreading and volcanism at the East Scotia Ridge. It is drifting toward the east, where it collides with the South American Plate. The result is a deep-sea trench extending to eight kilometers below the sea surface, and a chain of active volcanoes the South Sandwich Island Arc.

At the hot vents in this area, unique chemosynthetic-based ecosystems occur both on the ridge itself and on the underwater volcanoes of the South Sandwich volcanic arc. It is presumed that cold seeps will also be found here. Fluids and gases are (Kopie 2)

At the hot vents in this area, unique chemosynthetic-based ecosystems occur both on the ridge itself and on the underwater volcanoes of the South Sandwich volcanic arc. It is presumed that cold seeps will also be found here. Fluids and gases are released from both hot vents and cold seeps. The objective of the cruise is to examine these two systems in greater detail and to compare them. To help achieve this goal the remotely operated vehicle MARUM-Quest will make its first dive in the southern polar region.

Organisms living at the vents and seeps obtain energy from chemical compounds in the fluids released at these sites. In particular, the geographic proximity of a spreading ridge to a subduction zone in the target area raises additional interest for the expedition team. A multidisciplinary approach is being applied, involving experts from geology, geochemistry, biology, microbiology and marine biogeography. Furthermore, for the first time, scientists onshore at MARUM – the Center for Marine Environmental Sciences of the University of Bremen will be able to follow the dives during the cruise and thus be able to contribute their expertise in real time.

 

More information:

https://www.marum.de/en/Research/PS119.html

 

Participating Institutes:

Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research
British Antarctic Survey (GB)
Boone Pickens School of Geology, Oklahoma State University (USA)
Centrum für Naturkunde (CeNak), Universität Hamburg
College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University (USA)
Institut für Geographie und Geologie der Universität Greifswald
Institut de Physique du Globe Paris, Sorbonne (F)
MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen
Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology
National Oceanography Centre (GB)
School of Biological Sciences, Queens University Belfast (GB
School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds (GB)

Contact

Press Office

Folke Mehrtens
+49(471)4831-2007
Folke.Mehrtens@awi.de

Ulrike Prange
MARUM  Public Relations Team
+49 421 218 65540
Email: medien@marum.de