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Press Releases

4. June 2015: Few opportunities to change: ocean warming and oxygen loss are putting marine life under more and more pressure

If you want to live, you need to breathe and muster enough energy to move, find nourishment and reproduce. This basic tenet is just as valid for us human beings as it is for the animals inhabiting our oceans. Unfortunately, most marine animals will find it harder to satisfy these criteria, which are vital to their survival, in the future. That was the key message of a new study recently published in the journal Science, in which American and German biologists defined the first universal principle on the combined effects of ocean warming and oxygen loss on the productivity of marine life forms. Their conclusion: as climate change progresses, these animals will be hard-pressed to satisfy their oxygen and energetic requirements in their changing native habitats. As a result, these species will migrate to cooler regions or deeper waters, ecosystems will be disrupted, and the diversity of species will decline.

Go to press release: Few opportunities to change

 

2. June 2015: Spotlight on marine litter: A new book presents the current state of research

A new book gives an overview of the current state of research and of research gaps concerning litter in our oceans: “Marine Anthropogenic Litter” will be released by Springer-Verlag as an Open Access publication in June 2015. The editors brought together experts from around the globe to contribute to the book. Estimates of the amount of litter in the world’s oceans, its distribution, effects on humans and biota, and prevention strategies are just some of the complex topics addressed in the book’s 16 chapters.

To press release: Spotlight on marine litter: A new book presents the current state of research

 

 

On Focus

Ocean acidification - the evil twin of climate warming

Around half of the carbon dioxide volume discharged into the atmosphere through exhaust pipes and chimney stacks over the past two hundred years has been absorbed by the oceans - but not without consequence.


 

Warmer and more acidic waters will change the size and habitat of fish. (Photo: S. Zankl)

IPCC fifth Assessment Report

With their research and publications scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute substantially contributed to the IPCC report.We provide interviews, videos and fact sheets on the theme.


 

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Dept. of Communications and Media Relations

Head of Communications Department:
Ralf Röchert
Assistent:
Jacqueline Martin

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AWI Fact sheets

Fact Sheets on three IPCC themes AWI is working on: Sea Ice, Climate change and Ice Sheet - available in german language only: 

Fact Sheets